Songs Lyrics and YT- Youtube Music Videos

Chicago Songs - If You Leave Me Now Lyrics

If You Leave Me Now Lyrics By Chicago Songs Album: Chicago X Year: 1976 If you leave me now, you'll take away the biggest part of me No baby please don't

Chicago - If You Leave Me Now
Chicago - If You Leave Me Now


Chicago - If You Leave Me Now Lyrics and Youtube Music Videos

Album: Chicago X
Released: 1976

If You Leave Me Now Lyrics


If You Leave Me Now, you'll take away the biggest part of me
No baby please don't go
If you leave me now, you'll take away the very heart of me
No baby please don't go

A love like ours is love that's hard to find
How could we let it slip away
We've come too far to leave it all behind
How could we end it all this way
When tomorrow comes we'll both regret
Things we said today

'Cause I need you more than you'll ever know

Writer/s: CETERA, PETER P.
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group, SPIRIT MUSIC GROUP
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

If You Leave Me Now
  • Chicago's bass player Peter Cetera wrote this and sang lead. Cetera specialized in ballads, adding variety to the band's sound which featured many more rock-oriented songs, often written by Terry Kath or Robert Lamm.

    Cetera's ballads quickly became the band's biggest hits, with "If You Leave Me Now" their most successful song to that point, topping the charts in the US and UK. Of course, their record company wanted more of where that came from and kept pushing the Cetera songs - the big hit from their next album was his tune "Baby What a Big Surprise." The group found a new audience and became much more successful, but they also got earmarked as a soft rock group, which took the focus away from their grittier, horn-heavy songs. This became a point of contention for Chicago's famed section, especially trombone player James Pankow , who recalls constant battles to get the horns higher in the mix from that point forward.

    When Cetera left Chicago in 1985, his hits didn't stop: In 1986, "Glory Of Love" went to #1 US and his duet with Amy Grant, "The Next Time I Fall," made it to #4.
  • Lyrically, this is a surprisingly simple song, but it does have an unusual structure. Depending on how you look at it, there's either no chorus, or it's all chorus. The song opens with the title line, which is also the hook:
    If you leave me now, you'll take away the biggest part of me

    The next line gives Peter Cetera a chance to show off his vocal range, and makes it clear that he is full-on pleading:
    Ooooh no, baby please don't go

    The title then returns, but with another consequence:
    If you leave me now, you'll take away the very heart of me

    The rest of the song is Cetera making his case for why the girl shouldn't leave, in very histrionic fashion. He wrote the words around the melody, which he composed first. Cetera is very good at composing songs that push emotional extremes, and these songs are well suited to his voice, which can reach the notes to accentuate these feelings.
  • Considering their longevity and success, it's surprising how Chicago has been spurned by both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Grammys. The band's only Grammy award came for this song, when it won for Best Pop Vocal Performance By a Duo, Group or Chorus.

    The song also won the award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s), which went to James William Guercio and Jimmie Haskell.
  • This was the first Chicago single to feature an acoustic guitar lead. It was played by the band's manager, James William Guercio, who produced the track. Guercio is an accomplished musician who before working on this song had toured with The Beach Boys as a bass player. On "If You Leave Me Now," he played the acoustic guitar part as a demo, figuring their regular guitarist, Terry Kath, would put down the proper track when he was available. The band thought Guercio's part sounded great, so they left it on the record.
  • In the UK, this was Chicago's only #1 hit. In Britain, the group had nowhere near the success they had in America. They wouldn't make the Top 40 on the UK chart again until 1982 with "Hard to Say I'm Sorry."
  • Jimmie Haskell did the string arrangement on this song along with producer James William Guercio. Haskell had done a lot of work scoring films, and was able to bring a cinematic quality to the sound.

  • Post a Comment

    [blogger]

    Lyrics

    Contact Form

    Name

    Email *

    Message *

    Powered by Blogger.
    Javascript DisablePlease Enable Javascript To See All Widget